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Mario’s New Bike On Test: The Cipollini RB1K

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Back in 2010 the RB1000 was the new Cipollini bike’s debut platform. It was billed as the bike Mario would have wanted to ride when he was a pro, stiff and aggressive the bike was flashy, expensive and made entirely in Europe. Now, seven years later, Cipollini has finally updated its flagship race bike calling the new model the Cipollini RB1K and the PELOTON Service Course just unboxed one for testing.

PELOTON

The new RB1K is still billed as the bike Mario would ride if he raced and is reported to be considerably stiffer, which is surprising, since the original did not lack in that regard. Cipollini has also reduced frame weight by 125grams, taking it under 1000grams. This is by no means a light weight frame by today’s standards, but Cipollini himself was by no means a climber by any standard.

Two key elements that did not change are the bike’s very aggressive geometry and its production technique, which is what really sets it apart from any other production bike. The RB1K is a true monocoque. Where other bikes are bonded together from monocoque sections, the RB1K comes from a single mold, drop out to head tube. It’s a time consuming and painstaking process but it gives Cipollini engineers – some of the same engineers that design carbon parts for Ducati, AMG, McLaren and other leaders on motorsports – the opportunity to let carbon sheets run un-interrupted through areas other manufactures glue together like the bottom bracket, chain stays, seat cluster and head tube. This entire process occurs in Europe – 80% in Italy and 20% in Bosnia.

In addition to the lighter weights, increased stiffness and updated frame lines, Cipollini made a few other tweaks. The bike utilizes direct mount brakes for improved rim brake performance, the internal cable routing has been updated to better handle electronic groups and whatever comes next, the integrated seat mast is gone, replaced with a custom Cipollini aero seat post for ease of fit and travel.

As you might expect from a bike with Mario’s name on it, made by a company that produces parts for some of the most expensive cars in the world and made entirely in Europe the RB1K is very expensive. We’re bike we are currently testing has a $14990 price tag. It is built with Campagnolo Super Record 11 EPS, BORA Ultra 50 carbon clinchers, 3T carbon cockpit and a Selle Italia SLR saddle. Without pedals and cages the bike weighs 7.08kg/15.6lbs in size XXL.

We were big fans of the original RB1000, sure the price, design and spokesperson are over the top, but the bike flat out worked. It was a rocket ship in a final sprint and descended like a the proverbial Moto GP bike. We’re looking very forward to the test of the RB1K, as well as the scene it will cause at the coffee shop after the ride. Look for a full review in the pages of PELOTON very soon

For more info on the new Cipollini RB1K head to mcipollini.com