Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Brands

Gear

Going After Garmin: Magellan Cyclo315

Get access to everything we publish when you sign up for Outside+.

Competition is a beautiful thing, which is why we were so thrilled to see Magellan bring its new line of GPS cycling computers to the states. Garmin’s decidedly dominant position has resulted in snail’s pace development of cycling GPS. We want our GPS to better integrate with our phone, STRAVA, friends, electronic drive trains, and do it seamlessly across multiple protocols and do it all cheaper – things that will happen faster if multiple brands are competing for that coveted spot on your handle bars.

Ben Edwards

The new Magellan GPS computers have been available in Europe under the MIO name and now the Cyclo315 and the Cyclo505 have hit our shores. It’s the Cyclo315 we have been riding and we’ll be perfectly honest, we wanted to love this computer. It does so many things so well. The screen is full color, large and very bright. The customizable user interface is cleaner and easier to navigate with better touch sensitivity than Garmin. The Cyclo315 even has features that help it truly stand out from Garmin’s offerings, but with all this we still found it hard to love.

It’s preloaded with a US map based on OpenStreetMaps that feature bike shops, restaurants and other cycling POI’s along the way. The unit can provide routes that are entirely paved or different percentages of dirt, which the adventure riding crew is sure to love. A ‘Surprise Me’ option will provide three different rides based on pre set mileage or time. You can even share routes wirelessly between head units with a fellow Magellan user.

Magellan_1

Magellan’s specialty, which has been route guidance for touring riders, is now taking on performance oriented Garmin, and as such the 315 links up to a host of ANT+ devices, but strangely not a power meter. The Cyclo505 is needed for that. The Cyclo315 also lacks WiFi, which means sharing with Strava requires a cable and computer. It does however, link up with Shimano’s new D-Fly system, which allows you to see your gear on the display, right next to all your other data, numerically or graphically.

Currently no inline stem mount is available, although Bar Fly or K-Edge are sure to provide one soon. It would be a good thing. The unit is very large, much larger than the touring Garmins. For its size and price, the Cyclo315 misses two must haves, WiFi and power meter compatibility. The Cylco505 adds those options, as well as ANT+ trainer control, Bluetooth and smart phone integration. At only $70 more, and in an identical shape and size, the Cyclo505 is the only choice. While the Cylco315 provides a number of great features, if it were smaller and less expensive we’d be thrilled. As it is, it’s hard to love.

Cyclo315 Price: $430 w/ HRM and Speed and Cadence Sensor
More: magellangps.com